Grantee History

Through individual and pooled giving, we have invested over $17 million in the community in 23 years. Click below to read more about our past grantees.

For a print-out list of our grantees, please click here.

By Year: 20192018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 |

By Grant Category: Arts & Culture | Education | Environment | Health | Human Services | Partner Grant


2019

DNDA photoArts & Culture: Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association (DNDA) (Seattle)
DNDA’s mission is focused on integrating art, nature, and neighborhood to build and sustain a dynamic Delridge. DNDA offers a variety of services to meet this goal, from affordable housing to early learning and outdoor education. Our grant will go to their capital campaign titled Elevate Youngstown, to provide urgent structural upgrades to the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, a Southwest Seattle community hub that houses key community-based organizations, including Arts Corps, Totem Star, REEL Grrls, and The Service Board.

Unloop PhotoEducation: Unloop (Seattle)
Unloop enables people who have been in prison to succeed in careers in the technology industry through education, training, and support. Unloop provides training both in prison and once individuals have been released. Our grant will help support Unloop Studio, their in-house development shop, training incarcerated individuals in coding and software development to create a viable career pathway for formerly incarcerated people in tech in King County.

DRCC photoEnvironment: Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition (Seattle)
The Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition/Technical Advisory Group (DRCC/TAG) works to ensure a cleanup of the Duwamish River that is accepted by and benefits the community and protects fish, wildlife, and human health. DRCC is involved in all aspects of the superfund site cleanup plans for the Duwamish River, working to ensure the cleanup meets community standards by restoring environmental health and protecting the fishers and families who use the river as well as reflecting the priorities, values, and will of the people who live and work in the region. Our grant would provide general operating support to strengthen DRCC’s programs.

Cierra Sisters PhotoHealth: Cierra Sisters (Seattle)
Cierra Sisters’ mission is to break the cycle of fear and empower African American women and women from underserved communities with knowledge to detect, treat, and overcome breast cancer. Each year, over 100 Cierra Sisters community volunteers provide culturally relevant breast cancer education, support, and direct services to thousands of women in their community. Our grant will help Cierra Sisters build organizational capacity and hire staff, including a new Volunteer Coordinator to oversee the volunteers who annually support marketing, fundraising, and outreach efforts as well as provide in-home visits and transportation.

Chief Seattle Club PhotoHuman Services: Chief Seattle Club (Seattle)
Chief Seattle Club works to provide a sacred space to nurture, affirm, and renew the spirit of Urban Native Peoples. Chief Seattle Club serves over 1,400 club members, with over 100 members visiting the club for support every day. Services include hot food, medical, mental health, and traditional wellness support, housing assistance, legal aid, trauma-informed job training programs, a day center with showers and laundry, and a Native art program and gallery. Our grant will support their capital campaign to build a mixed-use facility adjacent to their current location in Pioneer Square, Seattle. The project is called ?al?al, which means “home” in Lushootseed.

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2018

Arts & Culture: Spark Central (Spokane)
Spark Central’s mission is to ignite the creativity, innovation, and imagination necessary for people to forge the path to their best future. Their work is rooted in the power of creative expression and explores the intersection between STEM, the arts, and literacy. By removing barriers and equalizing access to creative learning, Spark Central creates the opportunity to interrupt inter-generational poverty. Our general operating grant will build their fund development capacity, which will enable programmatic growth to serve more residents in the West Central neighborhood of Spokane.

Education: La Casa Hogar (Yakima)
La Casa Hogar connects and educates Latino families, to transform lives in Yakima Valley. La Casa offers three primary programs: (1) adult education; (2) early learning; and (3) citizen education and legal services. Our funds will help tear down and transform the dilapidated garage in the backyard into a preschool for their successful and affordable preschool program. The current preschool space in the main house will be turned into a multi-use room for the leadership development program, doubling classroom time for women.

Environment: American Rivers (statewide)
The mission of American Rivers is to protect healthy rivers, restore damaged rivers, and conserve clean water for people and nature. Our grant will help them advance four goals over the next five years within Washington’s Puget Sound and Columbia River Basin: (1) to protect 1000 miles of wild rivers; (2) to improve and restore 3500 acres of floodplains and meadows; (3) to restore access to 200 miles of habitat for native fish by removing at least 5 dams and/or improving fish passage facilities; and (4) to educate decision-makers about the need for water management funding.

Health: Daybreak Youth Services (Brush Prairie)
Daybreak Youth Services promotes involved, healthy communities by offering hope and recovery solutions to youth and their families struggling with addiction and mental health issues. Our grant will help launch their successful Paths to Prosperity (P2P) program at their Brush Prairie facility. This program aims to connect youth in treatment with outside recreation, volunteer mentors, internships with local businesses, and higher education through the coordination of activities focused on recovery and healthy living.

Human Services: Sawhorse Revolution (Seattle)
Sawhorse Revolution’s mission is to foster confident, community-oriented youth through the power of carpentry and craft. They offer free holistic carpentry and design programs to vulnerable and diverse youth in Central and South Seattle. Sawhorse Revolution impacts not only the lives of the youth who participate in their programs, but they also address broader community needs around homelessness. Our general operating grant will help expand programs, upgrade their capital infrastructure, and extend program staffing hours.

Group of young students with Partners AsiaInternational Partner Grant in partnership with Global Washington: Partners Asia (Seattle/Myanmar/Thailand)
Partners Asia supports community initiatives to improve the lives of Myanmar’s most vulnerable, many of whom live in unstable areas within Myanmar and along its borders. Our grant to Partners Asia will support two community initiatives: Fortune, and Beam Education Foundation. Fortune staff assist Shan migrants in legal counseling and work withe the local Thai government to guide refugees through legal procedures such as getting ID cards and work permits. Beam works to organize, train, and establish standardized curriculum and a transcript system for over 20,000 Mynamar children studying in 110 informal learning centers along the Thai-Myanmar border.

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2017

Photo of three men with 2017 Arts & Culture grantee The Seattle Globalist listening to mediaArts & Culture: The Seattle Globalist (Seattle)
The Seattle Globalist is a daily online publication that covers the connections between local and global issues here in Seattle. They highlight diverse voices and train the next generation of media makers. Our funding will help them continue to break down the barriers of entry into media for women and people of color, offering mentorship, guidance and connections as a powerful launchpad for new voices in Seattle.

Photo of two children from 2017 Education grantee Tiny Trees Preschool exploringEducation: Tiny Trees Preschool (Seattle)
Tiny Tree’s mission is to use outdoor classrooms to make a quality education in reading, math and science affordable for families and to give children a joyful, nature rich childhood – one full of play, exploration and wonder. Our funding will help them continue to respond to the soaring costs of childcare and its disproportionate effects on low-income families and communities of color by leading the movement for affordable, high quality preschool.

Photo of group of women at 2017 Envrionment grantee ReUse works with sewing machinesEnvironment: ReUse Works (Bellingham)
ReUse Works was founded on the simple premise that there is economic opportunity in both the products and the people that our society has discarded. Our funding will help them continue to increase the Ragfinery program’s capacity to provide job training services, sustainable textile recycling, educational outreach about textile waste, and inspiration for creative reuse, while moving Ragfinery toward economic self-sufficiency.

Photo of student with 2017 Health grantee FEEST cookingHealth: FEEST (Seattle)
FEEST empowers low income youth and youth of color in White Center and Delridge to become leaders for healthy food access, food justice and health equity. They organize 40-45 high school youth once a week to cook an improvised dinner using fresh vegetables from local markets. These community dinners serve as a pipeline to recruit and develop emerging food justice leaders for their year-long internship program. Interns develop and implement campaigns that seek to increase access to healthy foods for students and their families. Our general operating funding will support this work and the continued implementation of their ambitious strategic plan.

Photo of panel discussion with 2017 Human Services grantee BESTHuman Services: Businesses Ending Slavery and Trafficking (Seattle)
Businesses Ending Slavery and Trafficking (BEST) aligns and equips leaders to use the power of business to prevent human trafficking. Through training, consultation and collaboration, they work with businesses to drive behavioral change and improve the lives of the victims involved. Our funding will help them continue to reduce trafficking in our region by changing the attitudes, perceptions and behaviors that enable human trafficking to flourish.

Group of women from Para Los NinosEmerging Issues Partner Grant in partnership with Women’s Funding AlliancePara Los Niños (Burien), La Casa Hogar (Yakima)
Para Los Niños is a grassroots community organization dedicated to helping Latino families in Burien. Our funding helped them run their successful Latina Community Leadership for Change program, which includes curriculum about the U.S. education and political system, advocacy and community organizing, and individual leadership skills.

Group of people from La Casa HogarLa Casa Hogar’s mission is to connect and educate Latino families, and to transform lives in Yakima Valley. La Casa provides a range of educational opportunities that are specifically suited to the immigrant population in Yakima. Our grant provided funding to develop a women’s leadership program.

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2016

Photo from 2016 Arts & Culture grantee TerrainArts & Culture: Terrain (Spokane)
Terrain’s mission is to support local and emerging artists and culture creators by creating community through their annual events and programming. Our funding will enhance Spokane’s economic and cultural vitality by increasing its arts programming and opening new gallery and performing spaces that will benefit the region’s artists, musicians and performers. This is our first grant to a Spokane not-for-profit.

Photo from 2016 Education grantee Team ReadEducation: Team Read (Seattle)
Team Read pairs struggling readers with trained teen reading coaches for one-on-one tutoring after school and during the summer. Our funds will help to expand their summer reading program in order to combat the disproportionate impact of summer reading loss on minority and low-income students. Team Read also won a Pooled Fund Grant Award 10 years ago in 2006 – they are the second organization to win a second Pooled Fund Grant Award.

Photo from 2016 Environment grantee Washington Water TrustEnvironment: Washington Water Trust (statewide)
Washington Water Trust’s mission is to improve and protect stream flows and water quality throughout Washington state. Our general funding will help to build organizational capacity to effectively and rapidly respond to eminent water-related environmental threats, protect fish and wildlife in the Pacific Northwest, and improve water flow and quality in Washington’s rivers.

Photo from 2016 Health grantee Encompass NorthwestHealth: Encompass Northwest (North Bend)
Encompass Northwest partners with families to build healthy foundations for children. This grant will improve health access by providing mobile, life-changing therapies for children and families in under-served rural areas as well as locations such as homeless shelters, transitional housing facilities, schools and community centers throughout East King County.

Photo from 2016 Human Services grantee Coastal HarvestHuman Services: Coastal Harvest (Hoquiam)
Coastal Harvest’s vision is to provide access to nutritional value foods to all in their communities, regardless of circumstance, creating food security. Our general purpose funding will help to alleviate hunger and break the cycle of intergenerational poverty in Southwest Washington by purchasing and maintaining a refrigerated truck ready to deliver fresh food donations to food banks.

Family in embrace with Colective Legal del PuebloDiversity Partner Grant in partnership with Social Justice Fund NWColectiva Legal del Pueblo (Seattle)
Colectiva Legal del Pueblo is a non-hierarchal collective organization founded for and by undocumented immigrants working to build community leadership and power for migrant justice through legal advocacy and education. Our grant built deportation defense strategies with immigrants and their families who faced deportation by organizing, educating, empowering, and providing legal services to undocumented communities.

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2015

Path with Art photo - man with portraitArts & Culture: Path with Art (Seattle)
Path with Art transforms the lives of people recovering from homelessness, addiction, and other trauma by harnessing the power of creative engagement as a bridge to community and a path to stability. Our funding developed infrastructure to expand transformative arts programming to low-income, marginalized adults in recovery in order to help improve their lives and integrate into society.

Photo of graduates with 2015 Education WAWF grantee Freedom Education Project Puget SoundEducation: Freedom Education Project Puget Sound (Seattle)
Freedom Education Project Puget Sound provides a rigorous college program for incarcerated women, trans-identified and gender nonconforming people in Washington, and creates pathways to higher education after students are released from prison. Our general purpose funding expanded their accredited college program to incarcerated women in the Mission Creek Corrections Center in order to increase women prisoners’ economic and personal empowerment, contribute to family stability, and reduce recidivism through college education.

Orca and tankerEnvironment: Friends of the San Juans (Friday Harbor)
Friends of the San Juans protects and restores the San Juans Islands and the Salish Sea for people and nature. Our grant helped reduce oil spill risk in the Salish Sea and strengthen protections for fishing, culture, and the natural resources of this high value, high risk area by developing a nomination for a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) designation.

Group photo from ForefrontHealth: Forefront: Innovations in Suicide Prevention (Seattle)
Forefront is focused on reducing suicide by empowering individuals and communities to take sustainable action, championing systemic change, and restoring hope. Our funds built capacity within two rural communities to overcome barriers to suicide prevention by providing training to health and school professionals and by empowering those affected by suicide to work on behalf of the suicide prevention cause.

Photo of child and adult huggingHuman Services: Amara (Seattle)
Amara works to ensure that every child in foster care has the love and support of a committed family – as quickly as possible and for as long as each child needs. Our general purpose funding supported The Amara Emergency Sanctuary, a 24/7 home-like center providing children removed from their homes for their own safety with a safe oasis where they are warmly welcomed, fed, and, above all, given constant attention by professional and volunteer caregivers trained in the effects of trauma.

Photo of classroom of girls from 2015 International Grant grantee SaharInternational Partner Grant in partnership with Seattle International Foundation: Sahar (Seattle/Afghanistan)
Sahar partners with the Ministry of Education and Afghan-based organizations to build schools and educational programs for girls in Afghanistan, empowering and inspiring children and their families to build peaceful, thriving communities. Our grant supported Sahar’s Early Marriage Prevention Initiative, a combination of school programs, community support programs, and economic incentives designed to help minimize dropout rates among young women in Afghanistan.

Group photo from Young Women EmpoweredEmerging Issues Partner Grant in partnership with Women’s Funding Alliance: Young Women Empowered (Y-WE) (Seattle)
Young Women Empowered empowers young women from diverse backgrounds to step up as leaders in their schools, communities and the world through intergenerational mentorship, intercultural collaboration, and creative programs that equip girls with the confidence, resilience, and leadership skills needed to achieve their goals and improve their communities. Our funding helped deliver transformative program activities for diverse young women, and supported the organization’s ongoing efforts to build organizational capacity and powerful collaborations.

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2014

Arts & Culture: Shunpike (Seattle)

Education: The Martinez Foundation (now merged with Technology Access Foundation) (Bellevue)

Environment: Conservation Northwest (Bellingham)

Health: Open Arms Perinatal Services (Seattle)

Human Services: Community Youth Services (Olympia)

Diversity Partner Grant in partnership with The Seattle Foundation and AAPIP: API Chaya (Seattle)

International Partner Grant in partnership with Seattle International Foundation: Etta Projects (Tacoma/Bolivia)

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2013

Arts & Culture: Burke Museum Association (Seattle)

Education: Literacy Council of Seattle (now merged with Literacy Source) (Seattle)

Environment: Washington State Parks Foundation (Seattle)

Health: The Health Center (Walla Walla)

Human Services: Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (Seattle)

Diversity Partner Grant in partnership with Pride Foundation: Gender Diversity (Seattle), Reteaching Gender and Sexuality (Seattle)

Innovation Partner Grant in partnership with Community Center for Education Results: Southeast Seattle Education Coalition (Seattle)

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2012

Arts & Culture: Seattle Youth Symphony Orchestras (Seattle)

Education: YouthCare (Seattle)

Environment: American Farmland Trust (statewide)

Health: Bailey-Boushay House (Seattle)

Human Services: Cocoon House (Everett)

International Partner Grant in partnership with Seattle International Foundation and Global Washington: Amigos de Santa Cruz (Seattle/Guatemala)

Diversity Partner Grant in partnership with Latino Community Fund of Washington: Children of the Valley (Mount Vernon)

Innovation Partner Grant in partnership with The Seattle Foundation: Latinos for Community Transformation (now Para Los Niños) (Burien)

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2011

Arts & Culture: Seattle Shakespeare Company (Seattle)

Education: Seattle Education Access (Seattle)

Environment: WA Sustainable Food & Farming Network (now Food Action) (Seattle)

Health: Sound Mental Health (now Sound) (Tukwila)

Human Services: Family Law CASA of King County

International Partner Grant in partnership with Seattle International Foundation: One by One (now Worldwide Fistula Fund) (Seattle)

Diversity Partner Grant in partnership with Potlach Fund: Native American Women’s Dialogue on Infant Mortality (Seattle)

Innovation Partner Grant in partnership with The Seattle Foundation: Kenyan Women’s Association (Seattle)

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2010

Arts & Culture: Seattle Music Partners (Seattle)

Education: Healthy Start (Kirkland)

Environment: Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition (Seattle)

Health: Refugee Women’s Alliance (Seattle)

Human Services: Emergency Food Network (Lakewood)

International Partner Grant in partnership with Seattle International Foundation: PeaceTrees Vietnam (Seattle/Vietnam)

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2009

Arts & Culture: Northwest African American Museum (Seattle)

Education: College Possible Washington (formerly College Access Now) (Seattle)

Environment: Cascade Land Conservancy (now Forterra) (Seattle)

Health: King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (Seattle)

Human Services: The Mockingbird Society (Seattle)

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2008

Arts & Culture: Artist Trust (Seattle)

Education: Friends of the Children (Seattle)

Environment: PCC Farmland Trust (Seattle)

Health: First Place (Seattle)

Human Services: Girl Scouts of Western Washington (Seattle)

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2007

Arts & Culture: Seattle Arts & Lectures (Seattle)

Education: Seattle MESA (Seattle)

Environment: Puget Soundkeeper Alliance (Seattle)

Health: Youth Suicide Prevention Program (now merged with Crisis Connections) (Seattle)

Human Services: Seattle Milk Fund (Seattle)

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2006

Arts & Culture: The Vera Project (Seattle)

Education: Team Read (Seattle)

Environment: EarthCorps (Seattle)

Health: Pike Place Market Foundation (Seattle)

Human Services: WA Women’s Employment and Education (Tacoma)

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2005

Arts & Culture: Academy of Children’s Theatre (Richland)

Education: Community for Youth (Seattle)

Environment: Skagitonians to Preserve Farmland (Mount Vernon)

Health: Okanogan Family Planning (Omak)

Human Services: Jubilee Women’s Center (Seattle)

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2004

Arts & Culture: Arts Corps (Seattle)

Education: The New School Foundation (Seattle)

Environment: Washington Toxics Coalition (now Toxic-Free Future) (Seattle)

Health: Medical Teams International (Redmond)

Human Services: Children’s Home Society (Seattle)

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2003

Arts & Culture: Town Hall Association (Seattle)

Education: Rainier Scholars (Seattle)

Environment: Bike Works (Seattle)

Health: UW Center, Women’s Lifetime Fitness (Seattle)

Human Services: Family & Adult Service Center (Seattle)

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2002

Arts & Culture: Friends of Washington Music (Seattle)

Education: Daniel Bagley Elementary Montessori (Seattle)

Environment: Futurewise (Seattle)

Health: Pediatric Interim Care Center (Kent)

Human Services: Child Care Resources (Seattle)

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2001

Arts & Culture: Rotary Boys & Girls Club (Seattle)

Education: Powerful Voices (Seattle)

Environment: People for Puget Sound (Seattle)

Health: Dr. J.L. Nelson: Autoimmune Disease (Seattle)

Human Services: Childhaven (Seattle)

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2000

Education: City Year/Treehouse: Teen Time (Seattle)

Health: Puget Sound Neighbor Health Centers (Greater Seattle Area) / Planned Parenthood of the Greater NW (Seattle)

Human Services: Medina Children’s Services (now Amara) (Seattle)

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1999

Health: Country Doctor (Seattle)

Human Services: STARS: King County Youth Services (Seattle) / Seattle Children’s Home (now merged with Navos) (Seattle)

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1998

Environment: The Nature Conservancy (Washington)

Health: Children’s Hospital Brain Tumor Research (Seattle)

Human Services: Farestart (Seattle)

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1997

Education: Alliance for Education: The Galef Project (Seattle)

Human Services: Washington Works (Seattle)

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1996

Human Services: Mothers Against Violence in America (Puget Sound)

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Arts & Culture

2019: Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association (Seattle)
2018: Spark Central (Spokane)
2017: The Seattle Globalist (Seattle)
2016: Terrain (Spokane)
2015: Path with Art (Seattle)
2014: Shunpike (Seattle)
2013: Burke Museum Association (Seattle)
2012: Seattle Youth Symphony Orchestras (Seattle)
2011: Seattle Shakespeare Company (Seattle)
2010: Seattle Music Partners (Seattle)
2009: Northwest African American Museum (Seattle)
2008: Artist Trust (Seattle)
2007: Seattle Arts & Lectures (Seattle)
2006: The Vera Project (Seattle)
2005: Academy of Children’s Theatre (Richland)
2004: Arts Corps (Seattle)
2003: Town Hall Association (Seattle)
2002: Friends of Washington Music (Seattle)
2001: Rotary Boys & Girls Club (Seattle)

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Education

2019: Unloop (Seattle)
2018: La Casa Hogar (Yakima)
2017: Tiny Trees Preschool (Seattle)
2016: Team Read (Seattle)
2015: Freedom Education Project Puget Sound (Seattle)
2014: The Martinez Foundation (now merged with Technology Access Foundation) (Bellevue)
2013: Literacy Council of Seattle (now merged with Literacy Source) (Seattle)
2012: YouthCare (Seattle)
2011: Seattle Education Access (Seattle)
2010: Healthy Start (Kirkland)
2009: College Possible Washington (formerly College Access Now) (Seattle)
2008: Friends of the Children (Seattle)
2007: Seattle MESA (Seattle)
2006: Team Read (Seattle)
2005: Community for Youth (Seattle)
2004: The New School Foundation (Seattle)
2003: Rainier Scholars (Seattle)
2002: Daniel Bagley Elementary Montessori (Seattle)
2001: Powerful Voices (Seattle)
2000: City Year/Treehouse: Teen Time (Seattle)
1997: Alliance for Education: The Galef Project (Seattle)

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Environment

2019: Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition (Seattle)
2018: American Rivers (statewide)
2017: ReUse Works (Bellingham)
2016: Washington Water Trust  (statewide)
2015: Friends of the San Juans (Friday Harbor)
2014: Conservation Northwest (Bellingham)
2013: Washington State Parks Foundation (Seattle)
2012: American Farmland Trust (statewide)
2011: WA Sustainable Food & Farming Network (now Food Action) (Seattle)
2010: Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition (Seattle)
2009: Cascade Land Conservancy (now Forterra) (Seattle)
2008: PCC Farmland Trust (Seattle)
2007: Puget Soundkeeper Alliance (Seattle)
2006: EarthCorps (Seattle)
2005: Skagitonians to Preserve Farmland (Mount Vernon)
2004: Washington Toxics Coalition (now Toxic-Free Future) (Seattle)
2003: Bike Works (Seattle)
2002: Futurewise (Seattle)
2001: People for Puget Sound (Seattle)
1998: The Nature Conservancy (Washington)

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Health

2019: Cierra Sisters (Seattle)
2018: Daybreak Youth Services (Brush Prairie)
2017: FEEST (Seattle)
2016: Encompass Northwest (North Bend)
2015: Forefront (Seattle)
2014: Open Arms Perinatal Services (Seattle)
2013: The Health Center (Walla Walla)
2012: Bailey-Boushay House (Seattle)
2011: Sound Mental Health (now Sound) (Tukwila)
2010: Refugee Women’s Alliance (Seattle)
2009: King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (Seattle)
2008: First Place (Seattle)
2007: Youth Suicide Prevention Program (now merged with Crisis Connections) (Seattle)
2006: Pike Place Market Foundation (Seattle)
2005: Okanogan Family Planning (Omak)
2004: Medical Teams International (Redmond)
2003: UW Center, Women’s Lifetime Fitness (Seattle)
2002: Pediatric Interim Care Center (Kent)
2001: Dr. J.L. Nelson: Autoimmune Disease (Seattle)
2000: Puget Sound Neighbor Health Centers (Greater Seattle Area) / Planned Parenthood of the Great NW (Seattle)
1999: Country Doctor (Seattle)
1998: Children’s Hospital Brain Tumor Research (Seattle)

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Human Services

2019: Chief Seattle Club (Seattle)
2018: Sawhorse Revolution (Seattle)
2017: Businesses Ending Slavery and Trafficking (Seattle)
2016: Coastal Harvest (Hoquiam)
2015: Amara (Seattle)
2014: Community Youth Services (Olympia)
2013: Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (Seattle)
2012: Cocoon House (Everett)
2011: Family Law CASA of King County (Seattle)
2010: Emergency Food Network (Lakewood)
2009: The Mockingbird Society (Seattle)
2008: Girl Scouts of Western Washington (Seattle)
2007: Seattle Milk Fund (Seattle)
2006: WA Women’s Employment & Education (Tacoma)
2005: Jubilee Women’s Center (Seattle)
2004: Children’s Home Society (Seattle)
2003: Family & Adult Service Center (Seattle)
2002: Child Care Resources (Seattle)
2001: Childhaven (Seattle)
2000: Medina Children’s Services (now Amara) (Seattle)
1999: STARS: King County Youth Services (Seattle) / Seattle Children’s Home (now merged with Navos) (Seattle)
1998: Farestart (Seattle)
1997: Washington Works (Seattle)
1996: Mothers Against Violence in America (Puget Sound)

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Partner Grants

2018: International Partner Grant in partnership with Global Washington: Partners Asia (Seattle/Myanmar/Thailand)
2017:
Emerging Issues Partner Grant in partnership with Women’s Funding Alliance: Para Los Niños (Seattle), La Casa Hogar (Yakima)
2016: Diversity Partner Grant in partnership with Social Justice Fund: Colectiva Legal del Pueblo (Seattle)
2015: International Partner Grant in partnership with Seattle International Foundation: Sahar (Seattle/Afghanistan); Emerging Issues Partner Grant in partnership with Women’s Funding Alliance: Young Women Empowered (Seattle)
2014: Diversity Partner Grant in partnership with The Seattle Foundation and AAPIP: API Chaya (Seattle); International Partner Grant in partnership with Seattle International Foundation: Etta Projects (Tacoma/Bolivia)
2013: Diversity Partner Grant in partnership with Pride Foundation: Gender Diversity (Seattle), Reteaching Gender and Sexuality (Seattle); Innovation Partner Grant in partnership with Community Center for Education Results: Southeast Seattle Education Coalition (Seattle)
2012: International Partner Grant in partnership with Seattle International Foundation and Global Washington: Amigos de Santa Cruz (Seattle/Guatemala); Diversity Partner Grant in partnership with Latino Community Fund of Washington: Children of the Valley (Mount Vernon); Innovation Partner Grant in partnership with The Seattle Foundation: Latinos for Community Transformation (now Para Los Niños) (Burien)
2011: International Partner Grant in partnership with Seattle International Foundation: One by One (now Worldwide Fistula Fund) (Seattle); Diversity Partner Grant in partnership with Potlach Fund: Native American Women’s Dialogue on Infant Mortality (Seattle); Innovation Partner Grant in partnership with The Seattle Foundation: Kenyan Women’s Association (Seattle)
2010: International Partner Grant in partnership with Seattle International Foundation: PeaceTrees Vietnam (Seattle/Vietnam)

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